To Save the Rhinoceros from Alexander Vidal on Vimeo.

To Save the Rhinoceros, by Alexander Vidal Here’s a short motion illustration I created to help promote the conservation of the Sumatran rhinoceros and its environment.
The only living relative of the giraffe, the okapi is an elusive forest-dweller native to the jungles of the Congo. Illustration by Alexander Vidal.

The only living relative of the giraffe, the okapi is an elusive forest-dweller native to the jungles of the Congo. Illustration by Alexander Vidal.

Illustration highlighting some animals adaptations for life at a high altitude, including the snow leopards fur, and the condor’s neck-ruff of feathers.

Illustration highlighting some animals adaptations for life at a high altitude, including the snow leopards fur, and the condor’s neck-ruff of feathers.

Life in Black and White— an illustration highlighting the survival strategies behind many polar animals’ black and white coloration. By Alexander Vidal.

Life in Black and White— an illustration highlighting the survival strategies behind many polar animals’ black and white coloration. By Alexander Vidal.

Thanks Los Angeles, I’m Yours for featuring my animal project on their blog! It definitely makes me feel guilty for not uploading much of the work I’ve been doing lately. My most recent work has been centered around animals who make their home in the cold, like the above African penguin.

Thanks Los Angeles, I’m Yours for featuring my animal project on their blog! It definitely makes me feel guilty for not uploading much of the work I’ve been doing lately. My most recent work has been centered around animals who make their home in the cold, like the above African penguin.

Though our exploration of New Guinea introduced us to the birds that live on the ground and the kangaroos that live in the trees, we did not have time to meet one of New Guinea’s most notorious inhabitants. A resident of its lagoons and estuaries, and an object of worship to some of its inhabitants: the saltwater crocodile.

Though our exploration of New Guinea introduced us to the birds that live on the ground and the kangaroos that live in the trees, we did not have time to meet one of New Guinea’s most notorious inhabitants. A resident of its lagoons and estuaries, and an object of worship to some of its inhabitants: the saltwater crocodile.

Sorry my beasts for neglecting you! As a consolation, here’s an image I finished recently with a past beast: the asian elephant. This was an illustration I did to describe my time living and exploring in Southeast Asia, when each day seemed to offer an surprise or discovery.
Also, If any of your beast-o-philes are on Facebook, you can also like me at https://www.facebook.com/alexandervidalillustration to keep up with my latest projects. Thanks!

Sorry my beasts for neglecting you! As a consolation, here’s an image I finished recently with a past beast: the asian elephant. This was an illustration I did to describe my time living and exploring in Southeast Asia, when each day seemed to offer an surprise or discovery.

Also, If any of your beast-o-philes are on Facebook, you can also like me at https://www.facebook.com/alexandervidalillustration to keep up with my latest projects. Thanks!

Dinosaurs have long fueled the imagination. Dinosaur bones discovered in early human history were taken as relics of giants, dragons, or monsters. Even once they were correctly attributed to prehistoric creatures, some element of monstrousness remained— as is present in the name dinosaur, meaning terrible or fearsome lizard. Today, as much as our understanding of these creatures evolves, some flicker of this fear and awe lingers about the dinosaur— making them particularly attractive to children. 

Dinosaurs have long fueled the imagination. Dinosaur bones discovered in early human history were taken as relics of giants, dragons, or monsters. Even once they were correctly attributed to prehistoric creatures, some element of monstrousness remained— as is present in the name dinosaur, meaning terrible or fearsome lizard. Today, as much as our understanding of these creatures evolves, some flicker of this fear and awe lingers about the dinosaur— making them particularly attractive to children. 

From the forests of New Guinea we travel quite distantly— several hundred million years, in fact. To another forest similarly lush and overgrown. Here, below the giant cycads and tree ferns we find our next beasts: the dinosaurs. 

From the forests of New Guinea we travel quite distantly— several hundred million years, in fact. To another forest similarly lush and overgrown. Here, below the giant cycads and tree ferns we find our next beasts: the dinosaurs. 

While the cassowary and the echidna share New Guinea’s forest floor, another world exists above them in the canopy. There, in the absence of monkeys, lemurs, or sloths,  marsupials have evolved to fill the open ecological niche. One of the strangest is a creature whose relatives are much more familiar to us.

Further south, in the open grasslands of Australia, the red kangaroo is a large, bounding creatures designed to traverse the open terrain with ease. Here, among the high tree limbs of the rainforest, his cousin the tree kangaroo is a rather different creature. His body is small and compact, perfect for life on the branch; he has large claws for climbing tree trunks; and though some species of tree kangaroo can still hop like their austral cousins, some have evolved out of that ability, making them suited almost purely for life in the trees.

While the cassowary and the echidna share New Guinea’s forest floor, another world exists above them in the canopy. There, in the absence of monkeys, lemurs, or sloths,  marsupials have evolved to fill the open ecological niche. One of the strangest is a creature whose relatives are much more familiar to us.

Further south, in the open grasslands of Australia, the red kangaroo is a large, bounding creatures designed to traverse the open terrain with ease. Here, among the high tree limbs of the rainforest, his cousin the tree kangaroo is a rather different creature. His body is small and compact, perfect for life on the branch; he has large claws for climbing tree trunks; and though some species of tree kangaroo can still hop like their austral cousins, some have evolved out of that ability, making them suited almost purely for life in the trees.